Modulhandbuch

MBA: Master of Business Administration (MBA-E) (60 ECTS) im Fernstudium

Letzte Aktualisierung : 01.07.2019

Inhalte
Semester 1
Modul Leadership (DLMBLSE)

5 ECTS

Modulbezeichnung: Leadership

Modulnummer:

DLMBLSE

Semester:

1 Semester

Dauer:

1 Semester

Modul Typ:

Pflicht

Regulär angeboten im:

WS, SS

Workload: 150 h

ECTS Punkte: 5 ECTS

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

Unterrichtssprache:

Englisch

Kurse im Modul:

  • Leadership (DLMBLSE01)

Dauer:

Self-study: 90 h
Self-examination: 30h
Tutorials: 30 h

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren:

Please see the current list of tutors on the Learning Management System.

Modulverantwortliche(r):

Prof. Dr. Georg Berkel

Bezüge zu anderen Programmen:

• Master General Management (GM-120)
• Master International Management (MIM-120)
• MBA International Business (IB-60)

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen im Programm :

• Managing in a Global Economy
• Strategic Management

Qualifikations- und Lernziele des Moduls :

On successful completion, students will be able to:

  • Recognize underlying beliefs and attitudes towards leadership and compare the influence of various theories of leadership on the identification and development of leaders.
  • Outline the influence of social roles on leaders and employees, and assess the influence of roles types on the interactions between leaders and those they are leading.
  • As a leader, support employees by drawing on empirical evidence to effectively meet the expectations of employees.
  • Recognize the roles and conflicting interests inherent to leadership positions and develop strategies to address locomotion and cohesion.
  • Discriminate between effective and non-effective methods for managing staff and organizational activities, and apply those techniques and tools in practice to maximize the satisfaction and effectiveness of staff.
  • Perform the various responsibilities delegated to a leader such as communicate with employees, lead planning activities, delegate tasks, and plan and lead controlling activities.
  • Create a plan to support employees through the process of change within an organization.
  • Assess personal leadership style using a variety of measures and evaluate leadership activities relative to transactional and transformational leadership styles.

Lehrinhalt des Moduls:

  • Foundations of professional leadership
  • Leadership and motivation in the corporation
  • Leadership and corporate culture
  • Leadership and change management

Lehrmethoden:

Literatur:

See the contributing course outline(s)

Anteil der Modulnote an der Gesamtabschlussnote des Programms: :

5 ECTS von 60 ECTS = 8.33%

Prüfungszulassungsvoraussetzung :

Abschlussprüfungen:

See course outline(s)

Exam, 90 min (100%)

Kursnummer:

DLMBLSE01

Kursname:

Leadership

Gesamtstunden:

150 h

ECTS Punkte:

5 ECTS

Kurstyp : Pflicht

Kursangebot: WS, SS

Kursdauer : 1 Semester

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

Please see module description.

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren :

Siehe aktuelle Liste im Learning Management System

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen:

Siehe Modulbeschreibung

Beschreibung des Kurses:

In today’s knowledge-based society, employees are a firm’s most valuable resource. A key responsibility of leadership is to develop the knowledge, expertise, and skills of employees. Good leadership is crucial for the continued success of a firm in the face of increasingly competitive markets.

This course presents the necessary competencies of the leader in a modern, knowledge-based organization. Central questions raised by modern leadership theory are presented and discussed. In doing so, the course focuses on requirements and instruments of professional leadership, aspects of situational leadership, and leadership communication and interactions, both in the context of strategic management and change processes.

The methodological and conceptual foundations of leadership are presented to students, along with empirical examples and best-practice principles, with the intent for students to master the challenges of enhancing the firm’s most valuable asset—its employees—via professional and contemporary leadership practices.

Course Objectives and Outcome:

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Recognize underlying beliefs and attitudes towards leadership and compare the influence of various theories of leadership on the identification and development of leaders.
  • Outline the influence of social roles on leaders and employees, and assess the influence of roles types on the interactions between leaders and those they are leading.
  • As a leader, support employees by drawing on empirical evidence to effectively meet the expectations of employees.
  • Recognize the roles and conflicting interests inherent to leadership positions and develop strategies to address locomotion and cohesion.
  • Discriminate between effective and non-effective methods for managing staff and organizational activities, and apply those techniques and tools in practice to maximize the satisfaction and effectiveness of staff.
  • Perform the various responsibilities delegated to a leader such as communicate with employees, lead planning activities, delegate tasks, and plan and lead controlling activities.
  • Create a plan to support employees through the process of change within an organization.
  • Assess personal leadership style using a variety of measures and evaluate leadership activities relative to transactional and transformational leadership styles.

Teaching Methods:

The learning materials include printed and online course books, vodcasts, online knowledge tests, podcasts, online tutorials, and case studies. This range of learning materials is offered to students so they can study at a time, place, and pace that best suits their circumstances and individual learning style.

Course Content:

1 An Overview of Leadership

1.1 Leadership and Personality: Trait Theories

1.2 Leadership as a Skill: Attribute and Behavior Theories

1.3 Positive Reinforcement: Behavioral Theories

1.4 Leadership Dependent on the Situation: Situational Approaches

1.5 Situational and Contingency Theories

1.6 Theory of Functional Leadership Behavior

1.7 Integrated Psychological Theory

1.8 Transactional and Transformative Leadership

1.9 Leadership as an Emotionally Charged Process

1.10 Neo-Emergent Theory

2 Leadership as a Social Role

2.1 Roles and Groups

2.2 Role Types

2.3 Formal Conditions for Social Roles – Corporate Context Determining Roles in Organizations

2.4 The Individual and The Group – Conforming and Deviating Behavior

2.5 The Problems of Formalized Role Understanding and Self-Concept

3 Leadership from the Employee’s Perspective

3.1 General Expectations for Managers

3.2 Truthfulness and Authenticity

3.3 Handling Conflicts Competently

3.4 Conflicts in Groups

3.5  Conflict Resolution Pattern According to Matzat

3.6 Enthusiasm

3.7 Ability to Cope with Pressure

3.8 Assertiveness

3.9 Empathy

3.10 Expertise

4 Leadership from the Manager’s Perspective

4.1 Self-Concept as a Manager

4.2 Locomotion and Cohesion

4.3 Individual Problems and Learning Dimensions of Management Behavior

4.4 The Concept of Human Nature and Its Influence on Management Behavior: Theories from Maslow, McGregor, and Herzberg

4.5 Ambiguity Tolerance

5 Management Tools

5.1 Management Tools – Definition

5.2 Organizational Management Tools

5.3 Personnel Management Tools

6 Managerial Functions

6.1 Responsibilities of a Manager

6.2 Communication

6.3 Foundations of Interpersonal Communication

6.4 Planning

6.5 Setting Objectives

6.6 Delegating

6.7 Controlling

6.8 Creating a Feedback Culture

7 Organizational Change

7.1 Knowledge

7.2 Cultural Value Change and Subjectification

7.3 Globalization

7.4 Technological Progress

7.5 Change Management – Leadership in Times of Change

8 Successful Employee Management

8.1 Measuring Leadership Style and Leadership Behavior

8.2 Measuring Transactional and Transformational Leadership with the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ)

8.3 Correlation of Leadership Behavior with Subjective and Objective Success Criteria

8.4 Validation of Leadership Success Using Situational Factors

8.5 Leadership Principles Guiding Leadership Behavior

Literatur:

• Bloisi, W. C., Cook, C., & Hunsaker, C. W. (2006). Management and organisational behaviour. McGraw-Hill Education.
• Burnes, B. (2009). Managing change (5th ed.). Harlow: Prentice Hall.
• Coleman, P. T., Deutsch, M., & Marcus, E. C. (2014). The handbook of conflict resolution (3rd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
• Conger, J. A., & Riggio, R. E. (2006). The practice of leadership: Developing the next generation of leaders. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.
• Hannum, K., Martineau, J. W., & Reinelt, C. (Eds.). (2006). The handbook of leadership development evaluation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
• Harvard Business Essentials. (2007). Managers toolkits: The 13 skills mangers need to succeed. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
• Kotter, J. (2002). The heart of change. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
• Peters, T. (2005). Leadership: Tom Peter’s essentials. New York, NY: DK Publishing.
• Thompson, L. (2013). Making the team (5th ed.). Harlow: Pearson.
• Ury, B., Brett, J. M., & Goldberg, S. B. (1993). Getting disputes resolved: Designing systems to cut the costs of conflict. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Prüfungsleistungen:

Exam, 90 min.

Student Workload (in hours): 150

Self-study: 90
Self-testing: 30
Tutorials: 30

Modul Innovation and Entrepreneurship (DLMBIE)

5 ECTS

Modulbezeichnung: Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Modulnummer:

DLMBIE

Semester:

1 Semester

Dauer:

1 Semester

Modul Typ:

Pflicht, Wahlpflicht

Zu Details beachte bitte das Curriculum des jeweiligen Studiengangs

Regulär angeboten im:

WS, SS

Workload: 150 h

ECTS Punkte: 5 ECTS

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Unterrichtssprache:

Englisch

Kurse im Modul:

  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship (DLMBIE01)

Dauer:

Self-study: 90 h
Self-examination: 30 h
Tutorials: 30 h

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren:

Please see the current list of tutors on the Learning Management System.

Modulverantwortliche(r):

Prof. Dr. Georg Berkel

Bezüge zu anderen Programmen:

• Master of Business Administration (IUBH DL)
• Master International Management (IUBH SoBaM)
• MBA International Business (IUBH SoBaM)

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen im Programm :

• Leadership
• Strategic Management
• Change Management

Qualifikations- und Lernziele des Moduls :

On successful completion, students will be able to:

  • Describe the foundations, importance, and dimensions of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial activities and derivatives of entrepreneurship such as interpreneurship, corporate entrepreneurship, owner/manager relations and small/family businesses.
  • Analyze the opportunities and challenges associated with establishing a new venture and evaluate new business ventures using empirical criteria.
  • Differentiate between different motivations for business formation and develop specific objectives for new business ventures.
  • Develop a business model that includes specific measures to facilitate the sustainable growth of the new venture.
  • Recognize the legal designs available to formalize business formation and select the most appropriate design relative to the needs of the business.
  • Assess available financial sources to fund business/innovation activities and select the most appropriate capital/debt structure for the short- and medium-term.
  • Outline the role of various stakeholders and effectively manage relations with stakeholders with a vested interest in the innovation.
  • Construct a rigorous business plan that can be used as a strategic planning tool and utilized to secure necessary financial backing.
  • Enable students to adopt an “entrepreneurial mindset” to guide them in a variety of contexts in their professional lives.

Lehrinhalt des Moduls:

  • Innovation and entrepreneurship in a globalized economy
  • Fundamentals of entrepreneurship
  • Innovation and product development
  • Innovation, adoption, and diffusion
  • Applied innovation

Lehrmethoden:

Literatur:

See the contributing course outline(s)

Anteil der Modulnote an der Gesamtabschlussnote des Programms: :

5 ECTS von 60 ECTS = 8.33%

Prüfungszulassungsvoraussetzung :

Abschlussprüfungen:

See course outline(s)

Exam, 90 minutes (100%)

Kursnummer:

DLMBIE01

Kursname:

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Gesamtstunden:

150 h

ECTS Punkte:

5 ECTS

Kurstyp : PflichtWahlpflicht,

Zu Details beachte bitte das Curriculum des jeweiligen Studiengangs

Kursangebot: WS, SS

Kursdauer : 1 Semester

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren :

Siehe aktuelle Liste im Learning Management System

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen:

Siehe Modulbeschreibung

Beschreibung des Kurses:

Innovations and entrepreneurial activities are the foundation of and driving forces behind our economy. Taking a look at the economic development of countries, it seems that innovation and entrepreneurship is a critical player at every stage of the economic development cycle. In developing economies, small enterprises start to institutionalize the economic systems, and create supply, demand, and eventually markets; they are the seed for economic growth and prosperity. In developed economies, entrepreneurship and innovations are key drivers of competition, competitiveness, and survival in globalized economies and markets. This module exposes students to the ideas, drivers, and motives behind entrepreneurship as well as introduces them to the practical aspects of identifying, assessing, and progressing innovation.

Course Objectives and Outcome:

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the foundations, importance, and dimensions of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial activities and derivatives of entrepreneurship such as interpreneurship, corporate entrepreneurship, owner/manager relations and small/family businesses.
  • Analyze the opportunities and challenges associated with establishing a new venture and evaluate new business ventures using empirical criteria.
  • Differentiate between different motivations for business formation and develop specific objectives for new business ventures.
  • Develop a business model that includes specific measures to facilitate the sustainable growth of the new venture.
  • Recognize the legal designs available to formalize business formation and select the most appropriate design relative to the needs of the business.
  • Assess available financial sources to fund business/innovation activities and select the most appropriate capital/debt structure for the short- and medium-term.
  • Outline the role of various stakeholders and effectively manage relations with stakeholders with a vested interest in the innovation.
  • Construct a rigorous business plan that can be used as a strategic planning tool and utilized to secure necessary financial backing.
  • Enable students to adopt an “entrepreneurial mindset” to guide them in a variety of contexts in their professional lives.

Teaching Methods:

The learning materials include printed and online course books, vodcasts, online knowledge tests, podcasts, online tutorials, and case studies. This range of learning materials is offered to students so they can study at a time, place, and pace that best suits their circumstances and individual learning style.

Course Content:

1 Entrepreneurship and Innovation

1.1 Entrepreneurship and the Entrepreneur

1.2 Innovation

1.3 The Relevance of Entrepreneurship and Venturing Activities: The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)

2 Company Formation Strategy

2.1 Different Contexts for Forming Business Ventures

2.2 Objectives and Motivation for Forming New Business Ventures

2.3 Business Model and Strategy

2.4 Sustainable Development of the Firm

2.5 Your Company Formation Strategy

3 Legal Design and International Comparative Analysis

3.1 Main Categories of Legal Designs: An Overview

3.2 Basic Features of Different Legal Designs

3.3 International Comparison

4 Financing New Business Ventures

4.1 Financial Sources and Financing Instruments

4.2 Public Business Development Programs

4.3 Venture Capital

5 The Business Plan

5.1 The Purpose of a Business Plan

5.2 Business Plans – Expectations

5.3 Contents and Structure of a Business Plan

5.4 Guidelines for Preparing a Business Plan

Literatur:

  • Baringer, B., & Ireland, D. (2012). Entrepreneurship: Successfully launching new ventures (4th ed.). Harlow: Pearson.
  • Bessant, J., & Tidd, J. (2011). Innovation and entrepreneurship (2nd ed.). Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Evans, V. (2011). Writing a business plan: How to win backing to start up or grow your business. Harlow: Pearson.
  • Fleming, L. (2007). Breakthroughs and the “long tail” of innovation. MIT Sloan Management Review, 49(1), 69–74.
  • Gladwell, M. (2010, January 18). The sure thing: How entrepreneurs really succeed. The New Yorker, 24–30.
  • Hauschildt, J., & Salomo, S. (2011). Innovationsmanagement (5th ed.). Vahlen: Munich.
  • Scarborough, N. M. (2012). Essentials of entrepreneurship and small business management (pp. 17–47). Harlow: Pearson

Prüfungsleistungen:

  • Exam, 90 min

Student Workload (in hours): 150

Self-study: 90
Self-testing: 30
Tutorials: 30

Modul International Marketing (DLMMARE)

5 ECTS

Modulbezeichnung: International Marketing

Modulnummer:

DLMMARE

Semester:

1 Semester

Dauer:

1 Semester

Modul Typ:

Pflicht

Regulär angeboten im:

WS, SS

Workload: 150 h

ECTS Punkte: 5 ECTS

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Unterrichtssprache:

Englisch

Kurse im Modul:

  • International Marketing (DLMMARE01)

Dauer:

150 h

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren:

Please see the current list of tutors on the Learning Management System.

Modulverantwortliche(r):

Prof. Dr. Maren Weber

Bezüge zu anderen Programmen:

• Master General Management (GM-120)
• Master of Business Administration in Clinical Trial Management (CTM-90)
• Master Marketing Management (MMM-60/120)
• Master Personal Management (MPM-60/120)

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen im Programm :

• Global Brand Management
• International Consumer Behavior
• Applied Marketing Research
• Sales and Pricing

Qualifikations- und Lernziele des Moduls :

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • transfer well-known marketing management concepts to an international context, recognize limitations of their transferability, and continually develop these concepts.
  • perform a structural analysis of the context surrounding specific internationalizing decisions, recognize the various contexts in these scenarios, and formulate alternative decisions.
  • assess different strategic and political marketing alternatives in specific scenarios using relevant criteria and develop a decision template for developing marketing plans.
  • combine actual issues from industry with the most recent scientific insights into successful marketing approaches in order to develop the skills and knowledge required to manage international marketing in a corporate setting.

Lehrinhalt des Moduls:

  • Introduction to international marketing
  • The international context of corporations
  • International marketing strategies
  • Features of the marketing-mix specific to the international context
  • Trends in international marketing

Lehrmethoden:

Literatur:

See the contributing course outline(s)

Anteil der Modulnote an der Gesamtabschlussnote des Programms: :

5 ECTS von 60 ECTS = 8.33%

Prüfungszulassungsvoraussetzung :

Abschlussprüfungen:

See course outline(s)

Exam, 90 min (100%)

Kursnummer:

DLMMARE01

Kursname:

International Marketing

Gesamtstunden:

150 h

ECTS Punkte:

5 ECTS

Kurstyp : Pflicht

Kursangebot: WS, SS

Kursdauer : 1 Semester

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren :

Siehe aktuelle Liste im Learning Management System

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen:

Siehe Modulbeschreibung

Beschreibung des Kurses:

The most important task of international marketing is recognizing which international markets and business-related dependencies should be targeted for the marketing of products and services.

The course begins with defining key terms and concepts associated with the field of marketing management and then extrapolates these to the international context.

The first section of the course equips students with an understanding of how to perform a structured analysis of international markets, using elements of the “PEST Analysis” (political, legal, economical, socio-cultural, and technological frameworks). Strategical aspects of marketing as well as instruments used to analyze the marketing mix are discussed as they relate to the international context.

Inadequate consideration of marketing orientation as well as underestimating the impact of cultural differences both present serious threats to the success of any corporation. This course shall therefore analyze and discuss contemporary case studies involving multinational corporations to elucidate these potential threats.

Industry-based case studies also offer students the opportunity to put into practice the knowledge and tools acquired in this course to address some of the specific challenges of international marketing.

Course Objectives and Outcome:

The primary goal of this course is to enable students to make marketing decisions in an international context that are well-formulated and methodical, take into account important socio-cultural factors, and utilize specific marketing measures.

Specifically, students should be able to do the following after finishing the course:

  • Transfer well-known marketing management concepts to an international context, recognize limitations of their transferability, and continually develop the concepts
  • Perform a structural analysis of the context surrounding specific internationalizing decisions, recognize the various contexts in these scenarios, and formulate alternative decisions
  • Assess different strategic and political marketing alternatives in specific scenarios using relevant criteria and develop a decision template for developing marketing plans
  • Combine actual issues from industry with the most recent scientific insights into successful marketing approaches in order to develop the skills and knowledge required to manage international marketing in a corporate setting

Teaching Methods:

The learning materials include printed and online course books, vodcasts, online knowledge tests, podcasts, online tutorials, and case studies. This range of learning materials is offered to students so they can study at a time, place, and pace that best suits their circumstances and individual learning style.

Course Content:

1 Introduction to International Marketing

1.1 Issues Related to International Marketing

1.2 Environmental Factors in International Market Development

1.3 Features of Buying Behavior in International Marketing

2 International Marketing Strategies

2.1 Marketing Segmentation and Market Selection

2.2 Market Entry Strategy

2.3 Market Exit Strategy

3 International Marketing Research

3.1 Qualitative and Quantitative Primary Research

3.2 International Survey and Observations

4 International Marketing for Specific Sectors

4.1 Industrial Goods Sector

4.2 Consumer Goods Sector

4.3 Wholesale and Retail Sector

4.4 Service Sector

5 International Products

5.1 Product Policy

5.2 Product Mix and Degree of Standardization

5.3 Brand Policy

6 International Pricing and Terms and Sales Policies

6.1 Pricing on International Markets

6.2 Types of Price Discrimination

6.3 Credit and Discount Policy

7 International Promotion

7.1 International Promotion

7.2 International Promotion Mix

7.3 Optimal Standardization

8 International Distribution

8.1 Distribution Channels, Intermediaries, and Distribution Schemes

8.2 Organizational Forms for International Market Development

8.3 Potential for Standardization

9 International Marketing Mix

9.1 Home Country Orientation

9.2 Global Orientation

9.3 Multinational Orientation

Literatur:

• Bradley, F. (2005). International marketing strategy (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
• Cateora, P. R., Gilly, M. C., & Graham, J. L. (2008). International marketing. (14th ed.). London: McGraw Hill.
• Czinkota, M. R., & Ronkainen, I. A. (2007). International marketing (8th ed.). Mason: Thomson South-Western.
• Hollensen, S. (2010). Global marketing (5th ed.). Harlow: Pearson Education.
• Keegan, W. J., & Green, M. C. (2015). Global marketing: Global edition (8th ed.). New York, NY: Pearson Higher Education.
• Keller, L. K. (2011). Strategic brand management: A European perspective (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Financial Times Prentice Hall.
• Kotabe, M., & Helsen, K. (2010). Global marketing management (5th ed.). New York, NY: Wiley.
• Kotler, P., Keller, K. L., Brady, M., Goodman, M., & Hansen, T. (2012). Marketing management (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall International.
• Mühlbacher, H., Leihs, H., & Dahringer, L (2006). International marketing: A global perspective (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning EMEA.

Reviews:

• Chandrasekaran, D., & Tellis, G. J. (2008). Global takeoff of new products: Culture, wealth, or vanishing differences? Marketing Science, 27(5), 844–860.
• Douglas, S. P., & Craig, C. S. (2011). Convergence and divergence: Developing a semi global marketing strategy. Journal of International Marketing, 19(1), 82–101.
• Johnson, J., & Tellis, G. J. (2008). Drivers of success for market entry into China and India. Journal of Marketing, 72(3), 1–13
• Levitt, T. (1983). The globalization of markets. Harvard Business Review, 61(3), 92–102.
• Powers, T. L. (2010). Adaptation of marketing mix elements in international markets. Journal of Global Marketing, 23(1), 65–79.
• Tianjiao, Q. (2014). Product diversification and market value of large international firms: A macroenvironmental perspective. Journal of International Marketing, 22(4), 86–107.
• Schilke, O., Reimann, M., & Thomas, J. S. (2009). When does international marketing standardization matter to firm performance. Journal of International Marketing, 17(4), 24–26.

Prüfungsleistungen:

Exam, 90 min.

Student workload (in hours): 150

Self-study: 90
Self-testing: 30
Tutorials: 30

Modul Performance Measurement (DLMBPM)

5 ECTS

Modulbezeichnung: Performance Measurement

Modulnummer:

DLMBPM

Semester:

1 Semester

Dauer:

1 Semester

Modul Typ:

Pflicht

Regulär angeboten im:

WS, SS

Workload: 150 h

ECTS Punkte: 5 ECTS

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Unterrichtssprache:

Englisch

Kurse im Modul:

  • Performance Measurement (DLMBPM01)

Dauer:

Self-study: 90 h
Self-examination: 30 h
Tutorials: 30 h

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren:

Please see the current list of tutors on the Learning Management System.

Modulverantwortliche(r):

Dr. Tobias Broweleit

Bezüge zu anderen Programmen:

• Master Leadership & Management (MLM-60)

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen im Programm :

• Strategic Management
• Change Management

Qualifikations- und Lernziele des Moduls :

On successful completion, students will be able to:

    Report on a business’s financial performance using accounting calculations (such as return on equity, return on assets, return on investment, earnings per share, gross profit margin, etc.) and market-based calculations (such as price-to-earnings ratio, net present value, internal rate of return, etc.).

  • Explain the economic value added (EVA) model and calculate this metric using data from the company.
  • Identify, define, and track drivers of operational performance, specifically quality, dependability, speed, cost, and flexibility.
  • Derive performance metrics, such as customer satisfaction or sales forecast-to-plan performance, and link these with overall performance targets to create a performance measurement system.
  • Conduct a customer profitability analysis using activity-based costing and calculate customer lifetime value using company data.
  • Summarize strategies for benchmarking and measuring intellectual capital.
  • Measuring organizational performance using the following tools: Balanced Scorecard, the EFQM Excellence Model, the Performance Prism and the SMART Pyramid approach.
  • Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different performance measurement metrics and frameworks.

Lehrinhalt des Moduls:

  • Performance measurement concepts
  • Measuring financial performance
  • Drivers of financial and operational performance

Lehrmethoden:

Literatur:

See the contributing course outline(s)

Anteil der Modulnote an der Gesamtabschlussnote des Programms: :

5 ECTS von 60 ECTS = 8.33%

Prüfungszulassungsvoraussetzung :

Abschlussprüfungen:

See course outline(s)

Exam, 90 minutes (100%)

Kursnummer:

DLMBPM01

Kursname:

Performance Measurement

Gesamtstunden:

150 h

ECTS Punkte:

5 ECTS

Kurstyp : Pflicht

Kursangebot: WS, SS

Kursdauer : 1 Semester

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren :

Siehe aktuelle Liste im Learning Management System

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen:

Siehe Modulbeschreibung

Beschreibung des Kurses:

After specifying a company’s strategic goals, managers face the challenge to implement these strategies. Performance measurement and performance management support the implementation of strategy by using performance measures to address financial and non-financial/operational aspects. Consequently, students get to know the function of performance measurement and performance management as part of the overall management functions. Furthermore, they will acquire an understanding of various performance aspects (e.g. financial drivers measured by the economic value added, customer drivers measured and managed by customer lifetime value, process drivers measured and managed in the context of continuous improvement programs). Understanding financial performance measurement concepts is especially crucial before students go on to identify operational drivers.

Course Objectives and Outcome:

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the history of performance measurement theory and its influence of present-day understanding of performance measurement.
  • Report on a business’s financial performance using accounting calculations (such as return on equity, return on assets, return on investment, earnings per share, gross profit margin, etc.) and market-based calculations (such as price-to-earnings ratio, net present value, internal rate of return, etc.).
  • Explain the economic value added (EVA) model and calculate this metric using data from the company.
  • Identify, define, and track drivers of operational performance, specifically quality, dependability, speed, cost, and flexibility.
  • Derive performance metrics, such as customer satisfaction or sales forecast-to-plan performance, and link these with overall performance targets to create a performance measurement system.
  • Conduct a customer profitability analysis using activity-based costing and calculate customer lifetime value using company data.
  • Summarize strategies for benchmarking and measuring intellectual capital.
  • Measuring organizational performance using the following tools: Balanced Scorecard, the EFQM Excellence Model, the Performance Prism and the SMART Pyramid approach.
  • Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different performance measurement metrics and frameworks.

Teaching Methods:

A variety of learning materials are offered to students: depending on the course, these include printed and online course books, vodcasts, podcasts, online tutorials, case studies, and online knowledge tests. This range of learning materials is offered to students so they can study at a time, place, and pace that best suits their circumstances and individual learning style.

Course Content:

1 Performance Measurement as Part of the Overall Management Framework

1.1 Theories Before 1950

1.2 Theories After 1950

2 Measuring Financial Performance

2.1 Reviewing Traditional Models of Financial Performance Measurement

2.2 The Economic Value Added (EVA) Metric

3 Drivers of Operational Performance

3.1 The Five Operations Performance Objectives

3.2 Analysis of Performance Drivers

4 Customer Profitability Analysis, Lifetime Value, and Benchmarking

4.1 Profitability Analysis

4.2 Customer Lifetime Value

4.3 Benchmarking

5 Intellectual Capital Measurement and Management

5.1 Importance and Challenges of Intellectual Capital Measurement

5.2 Approaches of Managing and Measuring Intellectual Capital

6 Performance Measurement Concepts

6.1 Objectives of Performance Measurement Systems

6.2 The Balanced Scorecard

6.3 Performance Prism and SMART Pyramid

6.4 European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM)

7 Common Characteristics of Different Concepts

7.1 Common Characteristics of Different Concepts

7.2 Pitfalls in Performance Measurement and Management

Literatur:

• Bible, L., Kerr, S., & Zanini, M. (2006). The balanced scorecard: Here and back. Management Accounting Quarterly, 7(4), 18–23.
• Hammer, M. (2004). Deep change: How operational innovation can transform your company. Harvard Business Review, 85(4), 85–93.
• Ittner, C. D., & Larcker, D. F. (2003). Coming up short on non-financial performance measurement. Harvard Business Review, 84(11), 88–95.
• Kaplan, R. S., & Norton, D. P. (2008). Mastering the management system. Harvard Business Review, 89(1), 63–77.
• Kumar, V., & Rajan, B. (2009). Profitable customer management: Measuring and maximizing customer lifetime value. Management Accounting Quarterly, 10(3), 1–18.
• Neely, A. (Ed.). (2007). Business performance measurement: Theory and practice (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
• Speckbacher, G., Bischof, J., & Pfeifer, T. (2003). A descriptive analysis on the implementation of balanced scorecards in German-speaking countries. Management Accounting Research, 14(4), 361–387.
• Simons, R. (2000). Performance measurement and control systems for implementing strategy: Text and Cases (International edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
• Young, D. S., & O’Byrne, S. F. (2001). EVA and value-based management: A practical guide to implementation. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

Prüfungsleistungen:

Exam, 90 min

Student Workload (in hours): 150

Self-study: 90
Self-testing: 30
Tutorials: 30

Modul Financial Management (DLMBFNE)

5 ECTS

Modulbezeichnung: Financial Management

Modulnummer:

DLMBFNE

Semester:

1 Semester

Dauer:

1 Semester

Modul Typ:

Pflicht

Regulär angeboten im:

WS, SS

Workload: 150 h

ECTS Punkte: 5 ECTS

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Unterrichtssprache:

Englisch

Kurse im Modul:

  • Financial Management (DLMBFNE01)

Dauer:

Self-study: 90 h
Self-examination: 30h
Tutorials: 30 h

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren:

Please see the current list of tutors on the Learning Management System.

Modulverantwortliche(r):

Dr. Tobias Broweleit

Bezüge zu anderen Programmen:

• Master of Business Administration

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen im Programm :

• Corporate Finance

Qualifikations- und Lernziele des Moduls :

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • recognize and evaluate different equity and debt financing alternatives as well as internal and external sources of funding.
  • recognize the role that financial markets play in providing funding for companies and how these markets interact with companies.
  • explain the tension between risk and return.
  • recognize the importance of portfolio diversification and utilize the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) to evaluate financial instruments together with costs of capital.
  • describe options, option pricing, and how options are used in financial management.
  • critically discuss questions regarding the optional capital structure of a company from a theoretic and practical perspective.

Lehrinhalt des Moduls:

  • Introduction to finance
  • Legal forms of businesses and corporate governance
  • Discounted-cash-flow valuation
  • Risk vs. return
  • Options and option pricing
  • Capital structure policy

Lehrmethoden:

Literatur:

See the contributing course outline(s)

Anteil der Modulnote an der Gesamtabschlussnote des Programms: :

5 ECTS von 60 ECTS = 8.33%

Prüfungszulassungsvoraussetzung :

Abschlussprüfungen:

See course outline(s)

Exam, 90 min (100%)

Kursnummer:

DLMBFNE01

Kursname:

Financial Management

Gesamtstunden:

150 h

ECTS Punkte:

5 ECTS

Kurstyp : Pflicht

Kursangebot: WS, SS

Kursdauer : 1 Semester

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

Please see module description.

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren :

Siehe aktuelle Liste im Learning Management System

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen:

Siehe Modulbeschreibung

Beschreibung des Kurses:

Finance managers working within companies are tasked with managing and controlling a company’s finances and investment activities; they play a key role in a firm from the perspective of capital market participants.

This course provides an introduction to corporate finance and financial management. Students will gain insight into topics that are highly relevant in practice such as the goals and objectives of financial management within a company, measures for financial control, and the basic functions of capital markets. Basic tools of financial analysis such as the calculation of cash flows are also introduced. The course covers aspects regarding the determination of a company’s optimal capital structure and costs related to different financing options. Students will also be introduced to the basics of options theory and options pricing as well as the practical application of options in a company.

Course Objectives and Outcome:

On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • recognize and evaluate different equity and debt financing alternatives as well as internal and external sources of funding.
  • recognize the role that financial markets play in providing funding for companies and how these markets interact with companies.
  • explain the tension between risk and return.
  • recognize the importance of portfolio diversification and utilize the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) to evaluate financial instruments together with costs of capital.
  • describe options, option pricing, and how options are used in financial management.
  • critically discuss questions regarding the optional capital structure of a company from a theoretic and practical perspective.

Teaching Methods:

The learning materials include printed and online course books, vodcasts, online knowledge tests, podcasts, online tutorials, and case studies. This range of learning materials is offered to students so they can study at a time, place, and pace that best suits their circumstances and individual learning style.

Course Content:

1 Introduction to Financial Management

1.1 The Role of the Financial Management

1.2 Goals of Financial Management

1.3 Role of Financial Markets

2 Types of Business Entities and Corporate Governance

2.1 Legal Business Forms

2.2 Principal-Agent-Problem in Corporations

2.3 Corporate Governance

3 Long-Term Financial Planning

3.1 Equity vs. Debt Financing

3.2 External vs. Internal Financing

3.3 Organizational Growth and Financial Planning

4 Discounted-Cash-Flow Valuation

4.1 Single-Period Horizon

4.2 Multi-Period Horizon

4.3 Business Valuation

5 Risk vs. Return

5.1 Return

5.2 Risk

5.3 Risk and Return of Portfolios

5.4 Diversification

5.5 Capital Market Line

6 Options

6.1 Introduction to Options

6.2 Option Pricing Basics

6.3 Equity as Option

7 Capital Structure

7.1 Leverage Effect

7.2 Modigliani-Miller Propositions

7.3 Optimal Capital Structure

7.4 Capital Structure Policy

Literatur:

  • Brealey, R. A., & Myers, S. C. (2010). Principles of corporate finance (10th ed.). London: McGraw-Hill.
  • Brealey, R. A., Myers, S. C., Myers, S., & Brattle Group. (2003). Financing and risk management. New York: McGraw Hill Professional.
  • Brigham, E., & Ehrhardt, M. (2016). Financial management: Theory & practice. Cengage Learning.
  • Calder, A. (2008). Corporate governance: A practical guide to the legal frameworks and international codes of practice. London: Kogan Page Publishers.
  • Hillier, D., Ross, S. A., Westerfield, R. W., Jaffe, J., & Jordan, B. D. (2010). Corporate finance (European ed.). London: McGraw-Hill.
  • Madure, J. (2008). International finance management (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.
  • Vernimmen, P., Quiry, P., Dallocchio, M., Le Fur, Y., & Salvi, A. (2014). Corporate finance: Theory and practice (4th ed.) Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Weaver, S. C., & Weston J. F. (2008). Strategic financial management: Applications of corporate finance. Mason, OH: Thomson South-Western.

Prüfungsleistungen:

Exam, 90 min.

Student Workload (in hours): 150

Self-study: 90
Self-testing: 30
Tutorials: 30

Modul Managerial Economics (DLMBME)

5 ECTS

Modulbezeichnung: Managerial Economics

Modulnummer:

DLMBME

Semester:

1 Semester

Dauer:

1 Semester

Modul Typ:

Pflicht

Regulär angeboten im:

WS, SS

Workload: 150 h

ECTS Punkte: 5 ECTS

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Unterrichtssprache:

Englisch

Kurse im Modul:

  • Managerial Economics (DLMBME01)

Dauer:

Self-study: 90 h
Self-examination: 30h
Tutorials: 30 h

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren:

Please see the current list of tutors in the Learning Management System.

Modulverantwortliche(r):

Dr. Manuela Ender

Bezüge zu anderen Programmen:

• Master of Business Administration (IUBH DL)
• Master International Management (IUBH SoBaM)
• MBA International Business (IUBH SoBaM)

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen im Programm :

• Managing in a Global Economy
• Strategic Management

Qualifikations- und Lernziele des Moduls :

This course is devoted to the study of the economic analysis of the firm and the use of economic information as a framework for business decision-making.

Lehrinhalt des Moduls:

• The nature of managerial economics
• Market forces: Demand and supply
• Strategy analysis

Lehrmethoden:

Studienhefte, Übungsaufgaben, Video-Vorlesungen, Online-Tutorien

Literatur:

See the contributing course outline(s)

Anteil der Modulnote an der Gesamtabschlussnote des Programms: :

5 ECTS von 60 ECTS = 8.33%

Prüfungszulassungsvoraussetzung :

Abschlussprüfungen:

See course outline(s)

Exam, 90 minutes (100%)

Kursnummer:

DLMBME01

Kursname:

Managerial Economics

Gesamtstunden:

150 h

ECTS Punkte:

5 ECTS

Kurstyp : Pflicht

Kursangebot: WS, SS

Kursdauer : 1 Semester

Zugangsvoraussetzungen:

None

Kurskoordinator(en) / Dozenten / Lektoren :

Siehe aktuelle Liste im Learning Management System

Bezüge zu anderen Modulen:

Siehe Modulbeschreibung

Beschreibung des Kurses:

This course takes an in-depth look into the economic framework underlying markets and economies and the economic rationale underlying strategic decisions. In order to enable students to analyze the economic environment and draw conclusions from a managerial perspective, the first part of the course is devoted to the description and analysis of market forces. Following this, strategic decision making makes up the second half of the course. In particular, these latter units deal with the role of different market structures and asymmetric information as well as the fundamentals of game theory, which supports students to understand with the underlying decision making processes at work in modern economics.

Course Objectives and Outcome:

Students will:

  • learn about the micro-economic foundation of entrepreneurial decision making
  • learn about the relationship between economic theory and economic practices within the firm
  • be able to analyze and reflect upon the effects of micro-economic decisions
  • learn how to design efficient decision-making processes within their firm in order to keep their companies competitive
  • be able to explain economic behavior and design entrepreneurial strategies to manage a company successfully

Teaching Methods:

A variety of learning materials are offered to students: depending on the course, these include printed and online course books, vodcasts, podcasts, online tutorials, case studies, and online knowledge tests. This range of learning materials is offered to students so they can study at a time, place, and pace that best suits their circumstances and individual learning style.

Course Content:

1 The Nature, Scope, and Methods of Managerial Economics

1.1 The Nature and Scope of Managerial Economics

1.2 The Method of Managerial Economics

2 Market Force: Demand

2.1 Demand Analysis

2.2 Elasticity of Demand and Demand Determinants

2.3 Demand Estimation

3 Market Force: Supply

3.1 Production Theory

3.2 Cost Theory

3.3 The Determination of Price

4 Strategy Analysis

4.1 Nature of the Industry

4.2 Types of Market Structures Formed by the Nature of Competition

5 Game Theory and the Economics of Information

5.1 Game Theory

5.2 The Economics of Information

5.3 Auctions

6 Capital Budgeting and Investment Analysis

6.1 Capital Budgeting

6.2 Investment Analysis

Literatur:

• Baye, M. R. (2009). Managerial economics and business strategy (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
• Gupta, G. S. (2011). Managerial economics (2nd ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
• Keat, P. G., Young, P. K. Y., & Erfle, S. E. (2013). Managerial economics: Economic tools for decision makers (7th ed.). London Prentice Hall.
• Png, I., & Lehman, D. (2012). Managerial economics (4th ed.). London Routledge.
• Besanko, D., Dranove, D., Shanley, M., & Schaefer, S. (2009). Economics of strategy (5th ed.). John Wiley and Sons
• Kreps, D. M. (2003). Microeconomics for managers. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company.

Prüfungsleistungen:

Exam, 90 min.

Student Workload (in hours): 150

Self-study: 90
Self-testing: 30
Tutorials: 30